Monterey County is seeking additional FEMA disaster assistance

After a series of atmospheric storms swept across the Central Coast, Monterey County is seeking additional FEMA disaster assistance for damages throughout the county. Sheriff Nieto, along with officials from the Office of Emergency Services, Monterey County Water Resources, State Parks, Cal Fire, Monterey County Regional Fire, and Monterey County Regional Parks met with Sen. 17 Senator John Laird, 30th District State Assembly Member Dawn Addis, and the Monterey County Board of Supervisors Mary Adams and Wendy Root Askew were given a tour of some of the damage in Monterey County. The county currently qualifies for FEMA category A and B funding (debris removal and emergency protective measures). But now, they are seeking consideration for categories C through G (roads/bridges, water control facilities, buildings/equipment, utilities, parks and recreation). The FEMA categories are listed below: Emergency Work Category A: Debris Removal Category B: Emergency protective measures Permanent Work Category C: Roads and bridges Category D: Water control facilities Category E: Public buildings and materials Category F: Public utilities Category G: Parks, recreation and other facilities On Sunday, county and state officials were able to visit the following locations to assess storm damage. • Big Sur River, located near St. Francis Church, where a log jam has rerouted the entire river toward Hwy 1. • Big Sur River, 1/4 Mile south of St. Francis Church, where old growth wood has eroded significantly next. to Hwy 1. • Carmel Highlands, where several trees fell causing several residents in the area to lose power for 12 days. One of the fallen trees also hit the Cal Fires Station. • Carmel River State Beach, where the beach access parking lot was buried in sand and much of Scenic Drive was damaged. The car park and the south side of Scenic Drive remain closed due to these damages. • Dampierre Park, where part of the Carmel River berm failed, causing the Carmel River to divert over the basketball fields and into nearby homes on Paso Hando. Monterey County officials are continuing to gather information about damage caused by the 2023 Winter Storm throughout the county. The latest estimate of damages caused by the storm is nearly $80 million.

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After a series of atmospheric storms swept across the Central Coast, Monterey County is seeking additional FEMA disaster assistance for damages throughout the county.

Sheriff Nieto, along with officials from the Office of Emergency Services, Monterey County Water Resources, State Parks, Cal Fire, Monterey County Regional Fire, and Monterey County Regional Parks met with Sen. 17 Senator John Laird, 30th District State Assembly Member Dawn Addis, and Monterey County Board of Supervisors Mary Adams and Wendy Root Askew toured some of the damage in Monterey County.

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The county currently qualifies for FEMA category A and B funding (debris removal and emergency protective measures).

But now, they want to be considered for categories C through G (roads/bridges, water control facilities, buildings/equipment, utilities, parks and recreation).

The FEMA categories are listed below:

Emergency Work

Category A: Debris removal

Category B: Emergency protective measures

Permanent Work

Category C: Roads and bridges

Category D: Water control facilities

Category E: Public buildings and their contents

Category F: Public utilities

Category G: Parks, recreation and other facilities

On Sunday, county and state officials were able to visit the following locations to assess storm damage.

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• Big Sur River, located near St. Francis Church, where a log jam has rerouted the entire river toward Hwy 1.

• Big Sur River, 1/4 Mile south of St. Francis Church, where there is significant erosion near Hwy 1 due to fallen growth redwoods.

• Carmel Highlands, where several trees fell causing some residents in the area to lose power for 12 days. One of the fallen trees also hit the Cal Fires Station.

• Carmel River State Beach, where the beach access parking lot was buried in sand and much of Scenic Drive was damaged. The car park and the south side of Scenic Drive remain closed due to these damages.

• Dampierre Park, where part of the Carmel River berm failed, causing the Carmel River to divert over the basketball fields and into nearby homes on Paso Hando.

Monterey County officials are continuing to gather information about damage caused by the 2023 Winter Storm throughout the county.

The latest estimate of damages caused by the storm is nearly $80 million.

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